Station 10

Rabbit Creek

 
 

Located at the top of Rabbit Creek Road at the entrance to Bear Valley, Fire Station 10 stands centrally located to provide rapid access to the four corners of its area, as well as providing ready assistance to its neighboring stations. Opened in 1980 during the tenure of the late Honorable Mayor George M. Sullivan, the city planners chose to relocate Fire Station 10 from Rabbit Creek and Old Seward Highway to its present location to ensure rapid protection for Anchorage’s growing wildland/urban interface, more timely emergency medical care for the hillside citizenry and a strategic locale for swift wilderness rescue in the sprawling parklands surrounding this majestic backdrop.

Station 10 houses twelve personnel split between three shifts including a Senior Captain, two Captains, six Engineers (vehicle driver/operators) and three firefighters working on a rotating 24-hour shift schedule. Aside from responders, Station 10 also shelters several apparatus to ensure appropriate response to its diverse mission requirements. The primary response platforms include Engine 10 and Tender 10.

Engine 10 responds with a fire officer, an engineer and one firefighter, all of whom are trained to the minimum standard of Basic Emergency Medical Technician (EMT-1). Almost 80% of the calls the Anchorage Fire Department responds to are requests for emergency medical services, and fortunately four of the currently assigned personnel hold a paramedic license while another seven are EMT-2’s or 3’s. Engine 10 has four-wheel drive capabilities and contains 1000 gallons of water for initial fire attack and utilizes tire chains for winter operations to ensure appropriate ability to respond to all requests in its area. Tender 10 is also housed here and primarily delivers 2500 gallons of water for firefighting operations in areas without hydrants, which includes most of the hillside.

In addition to the standard services provided by your fire department, Fire Station 10 specializes in responding to wildfires in the wildland/urban interface as well as wilderness medical and rescue requests. During the dry summer months, Station 10 staffs Brush 10; a small, four-wheel drive fire engine with portable water pumps and specialized forestry gear to attack wildland fires quickly and efficiently. Another resource provided by Station 10 for wildland responses includes all-terrain vehicles to provide transportation for multiple firefighters and equipment in heavily wooded and hilly topography.

To assist our citizens who enjoy recreating within the parklands that surround the station, Rescue 10 previously provided a platform for summer and winter wilderness rescue. All station 10 personnel are formally trained and provide operational and technical expertise in wilderness search and rescue, low, moderate and high-angle rope rescue, avalanche rescue and recovery, swift-water rescue, and wilderness medical care. Unfortunately this service is no longer utilized by the current administration, so be safe out there this summer.

While the number of Station 10’s responses rank in the department’s lower tier, the diverse and specialized response profile of the station’s mission and the operational readiness of its personnel ensure a timely and appropriate answer to all our customers request for service. Feel free to stop by if you have any questions or take a tour of your local fire house.


Latest News for Station 10

Bio: Fire Station 10 (Rabbit Creek)

Monday, May 10, 2010

Located at the top of Rabbit Creek Road at the entrance to Bear Valley, Fire Station 10 stands centrally located to provide rapid access to the four corners of its area, as well as providing ready assistance to its neighboring stations. Opened in 1980 during the tenure of the late Honorable Mayor George M. Sullivan, the city planners chose to relocate Fire Station 10 from Rabbit Creek and Old Seward Highway to its present location to ensure rapid protection for Anchorage’s growing wildland/urban interface, more timely emergency medical care for the hillside citizenry and a strategic locale for swift wilderness rescue in the sprawling parklands surrounding this majestic backdrop. (more…)


Taking away those that protect you…

Saturday, February 20, 2010

FlattopWhen you live in a community that’s adopted “Big Wild Life” as its slogan, you expect that people who live in it are going to have an attraction to the outdoors. Some people joke that part of Anchorage’s draw is that it’s close to the “Real Alaska,” but how many cities can boast that their residents can canoe, kayak, and raft in rivers and lakes, scale cliffs, climb mountains, and even kite-surf all within their city limits? And one of the best things about playing in our wild backyard was that the Anchorage Fire Department was available to help out, if our residents had an unfortunate accident. Unfortunately, this may not be the case in the not too distant future… (more…)


Anatomy of your fire department…

Tuesday, October 27, 2009

Fire Engines carry small hose used to attack fires, large hose used to pump water from a hydrant to another engine, and ground ladders. Typically engines will carry 3-4 personnel. Engines also respond to medical calls, so they carry Advanced Life Support equipment such as cardiac monitors. In an Emergency Medical System like we have here in Anchorage, engines respond with Mobile Intensive Care Units (ambulances) to assist with patient care, or in the event that an ambulance is unable to respond right away, to initiate patient interventions and stabilize the situation until an ambulance can get to the scene. There are 14 fire engines in the Anchorage Fire Service Area, covering just under 1700 square miles. (more…)